Table of Contents

Unit 3: Supporting Student Comprehension of Informational Text

3.1 What is Close Reading?

Time to Read

Close reading requires students to be actively involved in the text that they read, drawing understanding, inferences, and meaning directly from the text.

Close reading supports the CCSS for ELA/Literacy’s focus on students engaging in evidence-based discussion and writing about a text. Students need to be explicitly taught how to find textual evidence to answer questions and to support inferences that they draw from the text.

While a variety of reading strategies support student comprehension, the CCSS for ELA/Literacy emphasize close reading to draw understanding, inferences, and meaning directly from the text. The following videos will help you get a sense of what close reading looks like and how to define it.

Time to View

To begin, view the video "How to do a Close Reading" and notice the ways the students interact directly with the text of Dr. Seuss' "Oh the Places You'll Go!" This first example starts with a poem to give you a feel of what close reading looks like.

To gain a definition of close reading and how it relates to the CCSS for ELA/Literacy, view the following two parts of an interview with California State University, San Diego professor, Dr. Douglas Fisher.

Close Reading and the Common Core State Standards Part 1

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Close Reading and the Common Core State Standards Part 2

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Time to Try

Based on the videos of Dr. Fisher, answer the questions below. Review the videos if needed.

 

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